Published on January 12, 2015 in Casino Tips

Responsible GamblingAddictive behaviour is a fact of life. Whether collecting Barbie dolls or gambling at an online casino there will always be the chance of addictive behaviour patterns developing. While online gambling has long been accepted in the United Kingdom the recent move by the UK Gambling Commission to create a legal online gambling environment has led to an increased focus consumer protection.

In a show of support for this decision four of the top legal gambling companies in the U.K. – William Hill, Ladbrokes, Gala Coral and Paddy Power – have launched an independent responsible gambling body named The Senet Group. The Senet Group’s mandate is to educate the populace on safe gambling, as well as to ensure that its members advertise in a socially responsible manner.

The first step on this journey will be the use of the slogan “When the fun stops, stop” on all Senet Group member advertising. This messaging will be prominent in online and television ads, as well as 20% of all shop window advertising in local betting shops. 

GambleAware, a highly recognised responsible gambling association, has applauded the steps taken by The Senet Group. “We commend the Senet Group for its campaign to help gamblers stay in control of their gambling. This initiative is a new and important step in the evolution of responsible behaviour among British-based gambling businesses." said Marc Etches, CEO of the Responsible Gambling Trust.

The next evolution in consumer protection in U.K. might very well come from American soil. Harvard students have been working with Bwin over the last decade to create an algorithm aimed at identifying and managing potential gambling addicts. The algorithm uses a complex blend of addictive behaviour indicators and acceptable spend and staking patterns to trigger safeguards ranging from warning notices to trained counsellor interventions.

It is reported that William Hill and Ladbrokes are working on similar initiatives. Ladbrokes is looking into tying executive remuneration to their ability to reach or exceed consumer safety targets.